SPORTSFISH         FORUMS         FISHING         BOATING         GALLERY         LIBRARY         DIRECTORY     
 Fish Home : Welcome to the Sportsfish Network

 
 All Forums
 General Fishing
 Boats, Motors & Kayaks
 fitting auxiliary outboard half cab
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

aussiebushie
Pilchard



Australia
4 Posts

Member No: #14008

Posted - 25 Feb 2010 :  11:03:10 AM  Show Profile Send aussiebushie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Anybody got any hints on what to do and not do fitting a bracket for a auxiliary outboard, I thought it better than paddles just in case, as i do not know how good the main motor is, hasn't been in the water since a major powerhead rebuild.

Noelm
Marlin



1000 Posts

Member No: #10531

Posted - 25 Feb 2010 :  1:02:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit Noelm's Homepage Send Noelm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
not a lot to it really, there is a few golden (and obvious rules) make sure the motor will reach the water when needed, plenty have been caught out with short shaft motors and brackets up too high, make sure the motor is powerfull enough to propell your boat in windy/choppy conditions with you right at the stern steering and operating the motor, make sure the motor is run regularly to ensure it will start when needed, make sure the motor has a seperate fuel tank and line in case you have fuel problems, make sure you can actually get to the motor to start the thing when it is in the running position.
Go to Top of Page

fishingrod
Mackeral



Australia
97 Posts

Member No: #4256

Posted - 25 Feb 2010 :  2:24:31 PM  Show Profile  Visit fishingrod's Homepage Send fishingrod a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I run a 15hp long shaft with a high thrust prop. Its been on a 5m Cruise Craft and now on a Allison 189. Gets 4-5 knots easy in most sea conditions. 6-7 knots flat out. The extra weight on the transon can effect handling on some boats but mine still goes OK. My set up weights about 40-45kg.

Get a good adjustable mounting bracket and make sure its securely bolted on with backing plates or big washers. With vibration and offshore pounding the bracket really gets a hammering. Ive got a Tenob with adjustable height and had it for 11 years with no problems. They were around $400 last time i looked.
http://www.tenob.co.nz/shop/Outboard+Motor+Mounting+Bracket/Auxiliary+Motor+Brackets/Adjustable+Motor+Brackets/Stainless+Steel+Transom+Fit+Rise++Fall+Bracket.html

Ive got my motor sitting on the highest "shallow water drive" position and this has it about 5-10cm out of the water when on the plane. The prop is in the water when anchored and drags a bit when trolling. Ive got it lashed down to prevent it bouncing around.

As Noelm has said make sure you run it frequently and give it its own fuel supply. I run it on the hose and flush my aux every trip or monthly in the front yard at home.

Pics:



cheers
Rod
Go to Top of Page

GreenWays
Salmon



Australia
16 Posts

Member No: #14009

Posted - 27 Feb 2010 :  11:12:54 PM  Show Profile Send GreenWays a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Easiest way to determine the hight to mount your auxiliary bracket.
Fit the motor on your bracket, The bracket being in it's lowest position. Lift the hole thing up against the transom " muscles " Have some one looking to make sure the motor is standing vertical when the bracket is hard against the transom. and the cave plate is just below "THAT" area of the hull "about an inch or two" Then have your mate mark a line on the hull where the bracket is.
Then only drill one top hole, mount the bracket and tighten, Stand back and confirm the brackets sitting square, drill the rest of the holes, Remove bracket and silicone bolts/ washers/circles around holes. inside as well. ( Sorry this was step 2 )
Go to Top of Page

GreenWays
Salmon



Australia
16 Posts

Member No: #14009

Posted - 27 Feb 2010 :  11:34:39 PM  Show Profile Send GreenWays a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Step 1.
If your going to use the tiller handle, then your bracket needs to be on the side where the tiller handle will be closest to the main motor.
Full lock the main motor to the side your mounting the auxiliary motor.
Mount your auxiliary motor on your bracket and lift it to it's correct height, give about two inch's of space to the main motor and mark a line on the hull,..
Now you can go back to step two!
There are adapters to connect both motors for steering, Which means you can use less space if thats your problem.
Cheers.
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Sportsfish Australia © Sportsfish Australia 2000 - 2014 Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.19 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000